Family Advisor Question

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The Exiled One
Posts: 1714
Joined: Wed Dec 20, 2006 8:34 am

Post by The Exiled One » Thu May 23, 2013 8:23 am

bafata88 wrote:Look at any D3 roster and you will find some players that very well could've played D1 but did not get the chance because a roster spot when to someone else.
Maybe, but they would be below average players with little or no scholarship.
bafata88 wrote:If livin's son is competing against the Reilly or Nanne name, who do you think is going to get that roster spot?
If livin's son is happy with walking-on to a D1 program and warming the bench, then I'm concerned that his goals are out of whack.

The original question posted was if livin's son should seek out and establish a family adviser relationship. I say no, because you give them more power than they need. Feel free to meet people in the industry though (coaches, advisors, managers, and fans), but do it because it's fun.

JSR
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Joined: Thu Apr 23, 2009 5:26 pm

Post by JSR » Fri May 24, 2013 5:01 pm

The Exiled One wrote:The last couple of posters are saying what livinthedream wants to hear, but it's not what he/she needs to hear.

Are there below average players in D1? Of course there are. For there to be an average player in D1, there have to be below average and above average players in D1.

Are there average D1 players not in D1? No. All of the D3 superstars would be below average in D1.

Anybody who has to use "connections" to get their kid a D1 roster spot probably has a below average D1 hockey player. Their kid is either going to be a 4th liner or a healthy scratch. They may be a walk-on or have a partial scholarship (which may even be in jeopardy of getting yanked).

Again, don't focus on getting an adviser. Feel free to make connections though, as it doesn't hurt to know people, powerful or otherwise. However, the most important thing SHOULD go without saying (but it feels like there is so much cynicism that I have to say it anyway): The kid should focus on doing his best. When your kid has a coach that he trusts with a track record of producing top talent, your kid should ask him what he should work on and do that. The coach should be willing to help and may be more willing to discuss your kid with recruiters because of his dedication to improvement. It doesn't have to be the HS head coach either. It could be the Elite League coach, the assistant HS coach, the Ted Brill coach, the High Performance coach, etc.
I disagree with your use of the word "All" in that particular statement. I would agree if you used the word "most" but not "all", as there are D3 superstars who likely would have been average to maybe even above average D1 players but because of factors like grades or SAT scores, or off the ice incidents they couldn't get into a D1 program and ended up being All-Americans at D3 programs and then even go on to play at a decent level of pro hockey that some average D1 players cannot get to. So if you change the word to "most" I would agree with you but know of enough examples that "ALL" does not fit the bill

livinthedream
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Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2011 4:15 pm

Post by livinthedream » Mon May 27, 2013 12:42 am

Guys - thanks for all the feedback, pointers, and spirited discussion!

One thing I am not clear on: Exiled, you said that we would NOT want to pay a family advisor, as that would make him an agent and thus make our son ineligible for D1 hockey. We know a family who is currently using an advisor, and they said they DO have to pay, because if they received services for free THAT is what would make them an agent.

Very confused on this point - I'm sure NCAA clearinghouse could clarify, but guessing someone knows the answer to that off the top of their head?

Have a good weekend, all.

Tigers33
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Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:06 pm

Post by Tigers33 » Mon May 27, 2013 9:34 am

Q: How do I hire a family advisor? And who should I hire?

A: A family advisor can be a helpful and informative resource, but it is not necessary that you have one unless you are a player who is projected to be drafted in the NHL. If you are going to make a decision on an advisor we recommend you interview at least a few different advisors and as a family decide who you feel most comfortable with. We urge you to contact College Hockey, Inc. and use us as a resource at anytime while deciding on an advisor.

This is from college hockey inc. I personally would not use an advisor just to play college hockey. Use the resources that are available to you. Send out emails to all the colleges your son wants to play at, make a highlight video from his games, have your coach send out emails, network, and most importantly if good enough he will get noticed.

OnFrozenPond
Posts: 294
Joined: Wed Nov 17, 2004 9:48 am

Post by OnFrozenPond » Mon May 27, 2013 11:50 am

livinthedream wrote:Guys - thanks for all the feedback, pointers, and spirited discussion!

One thing I am not clear on: Exiled, you said that we would NOT want to pay a family advisor, as that would make him an agent and thus make our son ineligible for D1 hockey. We know a family who is currently using an advisor, and they said they DO have to pay, because if they received services for free THAT is what would make them an agent.

Very confused on this point - I'm sure NCAA clearinghouse could clarify, but guessing someone knows the answer to that off the top of their head?

Have a good weekend, all.
If you retain the services of an advisor you must pay for those services in addition to any training arranged by the advisor otherwise it is a violation of NCAA rules.

As stated previously, advisors are not necessary to obtain interest from junior and college scouts and coaches. Where they have a benefit is when families are unsure about navigating the post high school hockey landscape. For those that don't know what they don't know it may be helpful to know they have someone whose advice is solely in the players best interest. It can be confusing and for many players there can be a lot of choices to make...camps, teams, leagues, etc.

As with many of the discussions on this board it is not a on size fits all solution.

Murphy
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Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2007 11:56 am

Post by Murphy » Mon May 27, 2013 12:47 pm

I will share my families experience and beliefs. it appears there are many versions of what we believe....

There are many reputable Family Advisors in the area who give free advice and council and become your agents should your child play NHL hockey. These relationships are handshake agreements, are unpaid and advisors will approach those players who have a relatively reasonable chance of being drafted by the NHL.

Paid family advisers are individuals who get people to pay them on the chance they can help a player "land" a D1 position. Buyer beware here. Our coach in juniors strongly advised us to keep our money. That a good coach and a talented player would get further toward a D1 commitment without them.

I have also seen people use training programs for connections and exposure. The verdict is out on whether they actually help, or if they just "expose" the kids who already have earned the exposure through their own efforts.

As expressed earlier, some kids do gain exposure through genetics and name. Others by size. Others by play in key tournaments.

I believe at the end of the day, players need to continuously develop and play really well when the opportunity arises....Adv camps, elite league, playoffs, tournament, Ted Brill and showcases.

My 2 cents...

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