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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1555

PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:08 pm    Post subject: Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis Reply with quote

Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis

Interpretation: Head trauma in adolescence, particularly if repeated, is associated with a raised risk of future multiple sclerosis, possibly due to initiation of an autoimmune process in the central nervous system. This further emphasises the importance of protecting young people from head injuries.

Concussion in adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis - Montgomery - 2017 - Annals of Neurology
Read study at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ana.25036/abstract;jsessionid=689FF154FE8859A97B75C42C56CA717F.f01t02
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2017 11:10 pm    Post subject: Concussions Can Hurt More Than Your Brain Reply with quote

Concussions Can Hurt More Than Your Brain

Rob Lynall was working as an athletic trainer when he started noticing that his athletes returning to the field after recovering from a concussion were suffering more lower body injuries like ACL tears and ankle sprains than other players. They tested normally on all the measures of concussion recovery, but they kept coming back a few months later with other problems.

"I didn't have any data, that was just our experience," says Lynall, who's now a professor at the University of Georgia. But when he started doing concussion research a few years later, he focused in on the relationship between concussion and injury risk—and in December 2015, he published a study in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise that backed his anecdotal observation up with real data: For up to a year, he found that athletes who had a concussion were twice as likely to have a lower body injury as athletes who did not.

More research is piling up to back up the anecdotal evidence. Daniel Herman, professor of sports medicine presented data on injury risk at the American Society for Sports Medicine conference in 2013, and published a paper with those results in August 2016. Researchers from the University of Wisconsin and the University of Delaware reached similar conclusions.

Now, researchers are drawing connections between these findings and past research on changes a concussion causes to balance and movement. Those changes linger long after other symptoms of a concussion have gone away, and may contribute to the noted rate of injury—there's even some indication that they could lead to increased risk of arthritis."We know traumatic injuries predispose people to arthritis later in life, and changes in gait due to those injuries can hasten osteoarthritis," Lynall says. "If people have concussion and changes in gait, and it's for prolonged time, maybe it's setting folks up for arthritis."

Concussions Can Hurt More Than Your Brain
Read more: https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article/kz7w49/concussions-can-hurt-more-than-your-brain
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goldy313



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 30, 2017 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Irony is not the right word...... i just sat through a lecture today that put forth the concept that many times a secondary injury happens after a blow that causes a concussion i.e.the concussive blow causes you to be off balance and disoriented thus allowing another injury. One of the examples was of a girls soccer player who butted heads with an oppenent, immediately after she was run into by a team member and suffered an ACL tear. The concussion was not diagnosed due to the focus on the knee injury.

Op ed only........I wonder if Trump's kneeling tweets were designed to take focus away from the findings Aaron Hernendez had grade 3 CTE, which was revealed a day prior.

USA hockey is being pressured into eliminating checking until age 16......this would be disasterous for high school hockey.
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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jessica Dunne Concussion?

Jessica Dunne, Ohio State
Jincy is fine, just to clarify here, but I believe Jessica's hockey career is over due to concussion issues. It's sad that it had to happen for her senior year. She has been through a lot here. But, I think it is for the best. I know she would love to be out on the ice with her teammates, but I think she should be commended for thinking about life after hockey and deciding to do what is best for her health at this point. We will just have to manage with six or possibly seven D's this season.

http://board.uscho.com/showthread.php?120293-Ohio-State-Buckeyes-2017-2018-Home-Playoffs-This-Season/page2

Yeah, I knew it was Jessica but had not heard she had a problem. Any chance she might recover ala Kessel? That is a crappy way to end a career. You are right about the health thing, I worry about those kids & how often they I hear about surgery for hips, knees and even shoulders. They will be 60 one day and I hope they don't regret having played. Brains are another thing all together and they should always error on the side of caution.

http://board.uscho.com/showthread.php?120293-Ohio-State-Buckeyes-2017-2018-Home-Playoffs-This-Season/page3
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:24 pm    Post subject: Alyssa Grogan's Serious Brain Injury Reply with quote

Alyssa Grogan's Serious Brain Injury

Alyssa Grogan

"As I approached my senior year of college, I had suffered a pretty serious brain injury. I was still on the team but no longer able to play and had medically withdrawn from three consecutive semesters of school to allow my brain time to heal. During that time, I was a double major in Business Marketing Education and Management. I loved my business classes but struggled with what I wanted to do "when I grew up." Through my injury, I was really stripped of my identity, which had always been previously tied up in being an athlete. I spent many hours tagging behind Anissa Lightner to multiple community service events. As I began to process that I would never be able to play sports again, I found a new identity in the service of others.

In a lame attempt to finally put an adult resume together as graduation loomed, I was encouraged to apply for the Teach for America program by Anissa Lightner. She believed I would make a really good prospect. I believed I was desperate to finally force myself into the real world and the first step was to put a resume together. About half way through the interview process (a series of five interviews), I really fell in love with Teach for America's mission "to serve children who are traditionally underserved." When I was accepted into the program, I knew it was going to be one of the most challenging things I ever did.

… I cannot play hockey anymore due to my injury and never will again."

Backpack to Briefcase: Alyssa Grogan
Read more: http://www.gophersports.com/sports/student-affairs/spec-rel/101017aaa.html
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:28 pm    Post subject: Kelly Murray’s Two Concussions and Broken Collarbone Reply with quote

Kelly Murray’s Two Concussions and Broken Collarbone

University is a tough experience. Especially when you are trying to handle being an athlete and committing 5+ hours a day, not to mention your whole weekend, to your sport. It’s a commitment that many people who are just regular students in university can have a hard time relating to and understanding. But I am so grateful for the university experience I was given.

I spent two years in the states at Cornell University with a great group of girls, but two concussions and a broken collarbone had me reflecting on what I really needed in my University experience.

Finding Happiness Again
Read more: https://www.hankfittraining.com/finding-happiness-again-by-kelly-murray-2/
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greybeard58



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Posts: 1555

PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A Former U-M Hockey Player’s Advice: ‘Take Concussion Risk Seriously’

SHELLEY ZALEWSKI October 03, 2017 6:00 AM

After sustaining multiple blows to the head during his college hockey career, a Wolverine returns to campus decades later for specialized neurological help.
Both on and off the ice, former University of Michigan hockey player Ray Dries has a reputation for never giving up.

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During his three seasons with U-M (1982-85) Dries scored 28 goals and performed 37 assists.

Although his collegiate hockey career had many memorable moments, the most significant may be the one he remembers least: During a 1983 game against Michigan Technical University, Dries was hit hard from behind, falling headfirst into the boards.

After sitting out the next part of the game, he insisted on returning to the ice that same night.

“I felt like I was floating on the ice the rest of the game,” says Dries, now 56. “I don’t remember the actual hit; I saw it later, on the game film.”

As was common practice at the time, Dries didn’t receive prompt medical attention for his concussion, convincing his coaches that he could continue practicing and playing.

In the years since hanging up his skates, Dries found himself struggling more and more — first with memory, then with coordination and balance issues.

Looking for answers, he came to Michigan NeuroSport in 2012.

Multiple hits, many symptoms
The team at Michigan NeuroSport, a Michigan Medicine program that specializes in neurologic care for athletes, conducted a thorough evaluation to determine the origin and extent of Dries’ symptoms.

SEE ALSO: The Dangers of Untreated Concussions in Kids’ Sports

Neuropsychometric testing helped doctors better characterize the patient’s memory issues.

Many of his muscle-related problems fit a pattern of ataxia — a neurological condition impacting muscle control, coordination and balance — but additional testing revealed subtle signs of two rare conditions: dystonia (uncontrolled muscle contractions) and chorea (involuntary twitching).

Beyond understanding how his cluster of symptoms developed and progressed over the years, the team also considered the fact that Dries endured multiple blows to the head during his career — not just the one hit that resulted in his major 1983 concussion.

They concluded that Dries’ condition met the criteria for a relatively new clinical diagnosis: traumatic encephalopathy syndrome (TES), a degenerative condition resulting from one or more severe blows to the head.

Clinical researchers at Michigan NeuroSport are at the forefront of proposing a framework for describing TES that can be used to arrive at a diagnosis in living patients.

Their work, published June 2016 in the journal JAMA Neurology, is a vital step toward earlier intervention and more effective treatments.

Another neurologic condition, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (or CTE), may also arise from multiple head impacts and concussion. More widely reported in the media, CTE can only be definitively diagnosed under a microscope after death.

The relationship between CTE and TES is unknown; a person who has one does not necessarily have the other.


Ray Dries, center, pictured during his time playing for the University of Michigan men's hockey team.

http://healthblog.uofmhealth.org/brain-health/a-former-u-m-hockey-players-advice-take-concussion-risk-seriously
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

double entry

Last edited by greybeard58 on Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:32 pm    Post subject: Athletes being warned about opiate addiction dangers Reply with quote

Athletes being warned about opiate addiction dangers


“Children prescribed opiates before the age of 18 are 33 percent more likely to get hooked.”

...It all seems to start innocently enough. A player gets hurt. He/she wants to still play. One way to make that possible is by taking an opiate drug. That drug, like Oxycontin or a Percocet, reduces the pain and provides a strong feeling – a high, let’s just say – to the athlete.

It becomes a vicious cycle. First the athlete takes the drug so he/she can play. Then the athlete turns to the drug for the high alone.

...Valente said studies have shown, especially in young people, an opiate can change brain chemistry in less than a week.

Athletes being warned about opiate addiction dangers
Read more: http://www.northjersey.com/story/sports/columnists/darren-cooper/2017/10/05/athletes-being-warned-opiate-addiction-dangers/734973001/#pq=A2oeNi
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goldy313



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PostPosted: Sun Oct 15, 2017 7:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A bill being sent though many state legislatures requires parents to read and sign documents advising the risks of brain injury in contact sports, much like tabacco, is opposed by the MSHSL.....among others including Mayo Clinic sports medicine. Money triumphs all......
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:19 am    Post subject: Isabelle Germain Concussion Reply with quote

Isabelle Germain
Germain was a hockey star in her own right, before a concussion in high school sidelined her.

“Concussion is really what ended it,” she said. “It was my last year of high school hockey, just after March break, the end of the season, and I got blindsided right in the middle of the ice and got knocked out cold.”

The results were devastating.

“Unfortunately, that happened before Sidney Crosby got hit, because talk on concussions was so hush-hush before,” she said. “I was rushed to the hospital and I had a neck injury, ribs were hit, my shoulder was hurt, my hip was really messed up, so there were so many scary things going on at the surface that looking at my head was not their main concern.”

Germain said she rested after the hit, but resumed training that summer at Dalhousie but noticed she felt different on the ice - something wasn’t right.

“I had been upset, I had pain I had never felt before, I couldn’t open my eyes in the light,” she said. “As soon as Crosby got hit, my doctor got a report from other doctors sharing information and they then knew what we should do, and it was pretty immediate, they called and said ‘get her off the ice.’”

Germain did a CT Scan and an MRI and results showed some serious concussion trauma.

“I struggled with depression, I failed out of school,” she said. “There’s always an excuse with concussions, like ‘it’s her first year away from her family,’ or I was homesick or not adapting well to university life, but I knew at the end of the day that it wasn’t that.”

She said she doesn’t shy away from talking about her concussion because it helped to inspire her university degree - health promotion, where she focused her research on concussions.

King's-Edgehill hockey coach to help Team Nova Scotia at Canada Games
Read more: http://www.theadvance.ca/sports/hockey/kings-edgehill-hockey-coach-to-help-team-nova-scotia-at-canada-games-2296/
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:21 am    Post subject: Concussion Recovery Is Slower in Girls Reply with quote

Concussion Recovery Is Slower in Girls

Across the sexes, concussion is common in contact sports such as soccer and hockey, where heads bang and helmets clash. And, over the years, the public has become more aware of the serious health effects associated with repeated blows to the head.

...Overall, this latest study adds to a growing body of literature that shows girls have a higher incidence of concussions than boys and might also experience more persistent symptoms, says Robert Cantu, a neurosurgeon and professor at Boston University who did not take part in the new research. “This is one of the most robust studies in terms of the numbers of people involved,” he says, confirming “girls take longer to recover.”

Concussion Recovery Is Slower in Girls, Mounting Evidence Suggests
A new study adds to findings that female children and adolescents are more susceptible to head injuries
Read more: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/concussion-recovery-is-slower-in-girls-mounting-evidence-suggests/
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:23 am    Post subject: Jincy Dunne Concussions Reply with quote

Jincy Dunne Concussions

Q: On a more serious note, you’ve had some concussion issues, right? How many have you had and how did you get them?
A: I have received multiple concussions. Some were from hockey, and some were accidents from messing around playing with some friends.

Q: Has it changed the way you play?
A: Being out for almost two years, I definitely appreciate the opportunity to play more and I try not to take it for granted.

Meet a Buckeye: Jincy Dunne, women’s hockey
Read more: http://www.dispatch.com/sports/20171013/ohio-state-gameday--meet-buckeye-jincy-dunne-womens-hockey
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:25 am    Post subject: Health Summit Reply with quote

Health Summit Oct 24 and 25: Alzheimer's, CTE & other neurological diseases

Embedded


Powering Precision Health Summit
October 24th-25th, 2017
Cambridge, MA at the Charles Hotel

Powering Precision Health 2017 will focus on two of the most destructive and problematic disease categories—neurology and oncology—and will also feature deep dives into metabolic disease, including cardiac disease, infectious disease and inflammation. The powerhouse speaker line-up will present their latest progress on traumatic brain injury, concussions, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), Alzheimer’s, ALS, early detection and diagnosis of multiple cancer types, liquid biopsy, diabetes, cardiovascular health monitoring, exposing hidden HIV, and digitizing the immune system for the first time.

“Precision health is focused on finding a cure for Alzheimer’s, CTE and other neurological diseases,” explained Dr. Ann McKee, M.D., Professor of Neurology & Pathology, Boston University Medical School, and featured speaker at Powering Precision Health 2017. “I’m delighted to participate in the summit and very optimistic that we will soon find a way to diagnose CTE in living humans using biomarkers, and ultimately a cure for these devastating diseases. The groundswell of research in these diseases is truly inspiring.”

For more info: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170921005941/en

Program and registration info: http://www.pphsummit.com

List of speakers: http://www.pphsummit.com/speakers.html
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:26 am    Post subject: how dangerous is youth hockey? Reply with quote

When it comes to brain injuries, how dangerous is youth hockey?

When it comes to brain injuries, how dangerous is youth hockey?
https://beta.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/when-it-comes-to-brain-injuries-how-dangerous-is-youthhockey/article36595825
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:29 am    Post subject: waiver acknowledging risk of brain injuries Reply with quote

waiver acknowledging risk of brain injuries

Rick Westhead of TSN: "One question raised at this hearing: should parents of kids in football, hockey have to sign a waiver acknowledging risk of brain injuries?"

Traumatic Brain Injuries in Sports House Democratic members of the Energy and Commerce and Judiciary committees hosted a forum to discuss traumatic brain injuries. Doctors and brain injury specialists testified on the latest research on chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. Former NFL players and family members also testified about their experiences and health challenges since their time playing football, and shared their observations about what the NFL and private youth football organizations are doing-or not doing-to address player safety.

Watch at https://www.c-span.org/video/?435696-1/medical-experts-former-nfl-players-testify-traumatic-brain-injuries


Levy recently testified before a Congressional subcommittee on the dangers of concussions and CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy).
During that testimony, Levy revealed that he received "two calls" from the Lions in which he was told he "shouldn't talk about" CTE publicly.

..."It's my brain. It's not my shoulder, it's my brain. It controls everything I do, it controls everything we think, everything we feel," Levy continued. "And if I don't have the right to speak about that as a player, I think it really speaks about the culture of the NFL, of what those conversations are. I think that's indicative of the conversations that we don't hear. The closed-door conversations between owners. They still are trying to find ways to silence us."

..."My first few years in the league, I could get Vicodin like Skittles," Levy said. "You can get toradol shots like it was nothing. Any anti-inflammatory painkiller that gets you through the week.

DeAndre Levy says Lions told him not to talk about CTE, got 'Vicodin like Skittles'
The former Lions linebacker claims he was told not to talk about brain damage from playing football
https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/news/deandre-levy-says-lions-told-him-not-to-talk-about-cte-got-vicodin-like-skittles/
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