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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Thu May 10, 2018 3:43 pm    Post subject: White Bear news Reply with quote

Parker’s brain trauma revealed to be ‘worse than we thought’
By Bruce Strand/Sports contributor May 9, 2018 Updated 21 hrs ago 0

The brain disease known as CTE was not discussed by the late Jeff Parker, at least not with his family.

However, when more became known about Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), a condition leading to the suffering and early demise of many pro football and hockey players, Parker’s younger brothers Scott and John took notice.

“Jeff never talked about CTE with us, but I’m sure he did with other people, when he joined the lawsuit,” said John, referring to action by former players against the National Hockey League.

“But my brother Scott started looking into it, and he said one day, ‘You know, I betcha Jeff has this.’ And when Jeff passed, they called and told us the CTE Foundation wanted to talk to us about donating Jeff’s brain.”

Last Thursday, medical researchers confirmed that Jeff Parker, White Bear Lake native whose NHL career was cut short by a dreadful concussion in 1991, and who died last September at age 53, was suffering from CTE, which can only be detected after death.

“It was worse than we thought,” said Scott Parker. “We knew all along that he was suffering, but he masked it pretty well. He must have been suffering a lot more than we knew.”

Parker had one of the most severe cases of CTE, according to medical records provided exclusively to 5 Eyewitness News and The New York Times.

Researchers at Boston University’s CTE Center announced that Parker had Stage 3 (out of 4) CTE, the same level of the disease that was found in the brain of former NFL star Aaron Hernandez, who was convicted of murder in 2015 and committed suicide in prison in 2017.

"Jeff Parker’s brain was at such a stage – the disease was taking over his brain,” Dr. Ann McKee said in a phone interview from Boston, as reported by Eyewitness News.

“It was just going to get worse and worse — It’s very substantial brain damage. The nerve cells weren’t working,” stated McKee, chief of neuropathology at Boston's VA hospital and director of the CTE Center.

Scott Parker, after viewing photographs that showed how massive the damage was, told the White Bear Press, “It was pretty sad for me and my brother John to see that. Pretty hard to fathom.

“Jeff rarely talked about it, only in his darkest times, but his head hurt. He compared it to a freight train going through his head.”

The Parker family — Scott, John, and parents Charlie Parker and Linda Wenzel — donated Jeff’s brain to the CTE Foundation, after getting a call from Brad Maxwell, president of the Minnesota NHL Alumni Association, who had relayed the request to them.

Besides Parker, at least six other NHL players have been found to have had CTE, according to the New York Times. They are Reggie Fleming, Rick Martin, Bob Probert, Derek Boogaard, Larry Zeidel and Steve Montador.

Parker was among approximately 150 former players who filed suit against the NHL, claiming that the league thrived on the violence but did little to warn players of the long-term effects. The NHL’s counter argument is that nobody understood the impact concussions could have back in those days, and that the players were given reasonable care given what was known at the time. At this stage, both sides are waiting for a federal judge to rule whether the lawsuit can proceed as a class action.

“When he joined the lawsuit, I’m sure he had conversations,” John Parker said. “When he went to Washington, I remember him saying how it affected him, the stories about other players who died before him, how hurt he felt about that. The reason he joined the lawsuit was to help the next guy. With Jeff, it was always about helping the next guy.”

Jeff Parker’s death was attributed to infection that attacked his heart and lungs. He had been suffering from pulmonary hypertension.

Hockey gave Parker a charmed life for the first half of his time on earth. He helped White Bear Mariner reach the state championship game in 1982 and was a leading player on Michigan State’s run to the 1986 NCAA championship. After some minor league time he moved on to the NHL, spending three seasons with Buffalo before being traded to Hartford.

His playing days ended with a gruesome hit in Hartford 1991, when his head struck the stanchion holding the glass to the boards, after a violent check by a 230-pound Washington defenseman. That was his second concussion in 15 days. There had been other concussions, including in the minor leagues, said Scott Parker.

The second half of his life, post-hockey, was a struggle. Parker reported suffering from constant ringing in the ears, headaches from bright lights, and decreased hearing and sense of taste. John Parker said that when Jeff tried to take classes, he had to give up, unable to read and concentrate. In his last few years, the former NHL player worked as a bartender in St. Paul, partly to avoid bright light.

All three brothers played high school and.college hockey, and all three won NCAA championships. Scott got his at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, John at UW – Madison.

Scott Parker, a longtime high school hockey coach in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, was asked how he views player safety, in light of what happened to his older brother.

High school players are “watched very carefully,” he stressed, and their readiness to play after a hit is decided by team trainers, not coaches. He said players are repeatedly taught technique to avoid checking from behind. And above all, they get immediate attention from a trainer at any sign of trouble.

That last part is what haunts Jeff’s brothers, after what they learned about the aftermath of the severe hit in Hartford that night.

“They just put him down on the floor of the locker room,” Scott Parker said. “He did not receive any medical help. When he finally snapped to, he thought he was still playing for Buffalo. That’s how hard that hit was, and there was no immediate help.”

Scott Parker stressed that he and John still love hockey, and “Jeff would do it all over again” if he could.

“But that doesn’t mean I love the NHL. I’m sure the NHL has made changes, but they were not soon enough for my brother …. The NHL needs to take care of their boys; they’re the ones who made their owners a lot of money.”

John Parker was asked to talk about the old Jeff Parker again. He was happy to oblige.

“He was a big-hearted guy. People were attracted and drawn to him. For Scott and I, he was the golden boy. We wanted to be him. I would always hear about how kind he was to people, always with a big smile, a good guy, but tough as nails when he needed to be.”

Jeff Parker
Jeff Parker, shown here during his Buffalo Sabres days, died last September at age 53.

http://www.presspubs.com/white_bear/sports/local/article_1e22c496-53a9-11e8-b78e-37f6f73fa619.html
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goldy313



Joined: 05 Mar 2002
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PostPosted: Sun May 13, 2018 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meh.....nobody ever really thought brain injuries were normal.

Ex post facto is no longer relevant.

If you choose to smoke, text and drive, play contact sports....etc..?.maybe you have a better chance suing your parents, run track or xcountry, play tennis or golf.
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greybeard58



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Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 7:14 am    Post subject: Cassie Campbell-Pascall donates her brain Reply with quote

Cassie Campbell-Pascall donates her brain

Three Olympians and a pioneer in women's hockey announce today that they are donating their brains to the Canadian Concussion Centre (CCC) to advance research on the effects of concussion in women. These are the first known female Canadian athletes to publicly pledge their brain to a Canadian research centre.

The women, all highly decorated athletes in their respective sports, are:

• Cassie Campbell-Pascall: Two-time Olympic gold medallist, Order of Canada, Order of Hockey in Canada recipient and Queens Diamond Jubilee recipient.
• Jen Kish: 2016 Olympic bronze medallist, 2015 Pan Am Games gold medallist, and 2013 Rugby World Cup Sevens silver medallist as captain of the Canadian women's rugby sevens team.
• Kerrin Lee-Gartner: Olympic gold medallist and three-time Olympic team member in alpine skiing.
• Fran Rider: Competitive athlete and life-long advocate for the advancement of Female Hockey in the world, leading the drive for Olympic participation.

"The Canadian Concussion Centre is honoured to receive the commitment of brain donations from these legendary Canadian athletes and I applaud them for their decision," says. Dr. Charles Tator, director of the CCC. "Research is showing that concussions affect women differently than they do men, and our ability to analyse the changes that can occur in women's brains as a result of concussions will help us better understand and treat these injuries."

As individuals with their own concussion history, each athlete has expressed common hopes that this pledge will help advance the understanding of concussions, particularly among women:

"I wanted to be part of such a great group of women to donate my brain to the Canadian Concussion Centre to help with concussion research down the road," says Cassie Campbell-Pascall, the only Canadian captain, male or female, to lead a hockey team to two Olympic gold medals. "I loved playing sports and have no regrets, but having had some concussions I would like to make sure that future generations are protected as much as possible while still being able to play sports at all levels. I am also glad to be amongst this group, as we are the first to donate our brains to Canadian research and I am extremely proud of that."

"There are limits to the research that can be done on a brain of a living person; and a lot of the research has been primarily based on men," says Jen Kish, Canada's 2012 and 2013 women's sevens team Player of the Year. "I'm donating my brain in hopes that it will help with better evidence-based treatments and prevention strategies for traumatic brain injury, and give researchers an opportunity to compare a female brain to what they already know about a male brain. "

"I have been living with, and healing from, a brain injury suffered in a car accident in 2016. Of all the serious injuries, concussions and high speed falls I had as a ski racer, nothing has been as difficult to overcome as the challenges of post-concussion syndrome and the effect it has on my daily life," says Kerrin Lee-Gartner, the first Canadian in history to win an Olympic gold medal in downhill skiing. "I am therefore donating my brain to the Canadian Concussion Centre with the hope of helping future generations in the prevention and treatment of brain injuries."

"Dr. Charles Tator is an amazing person whose life-long work has saved and enriched the lives of countless individuals. His work and positive vision are leaving a powerful legacy for future generations," says Fran Rider, president of the Ontario Women's Hockey Association. "As a competitive hockey and fastball player for 35 years and a participant in multiple sports, I am honoured to donate my brain to science in support of the outstanding work done by medical researchers committed to safety in sport and in life."

The CCC comprises a group of 19 clinician and basic scientists, and is one of few research groups in the world to examine the entire spectrum of concussion disorders from acute injury to chronic illness including brain degeneration. Today's announcement also launches a partnership between the CCC and the international, U.S.-based non-profit PINK Concussions to direct Canadian women interested in donating their brains to research institutions in Canada.

"The CCC has learned a great deal from examining the brains of 44 professional athletes to date, however all of the donors were male," says Dr. Tator. "It is important to include women as part of this research."

This weekend, the CCC hosts its 6th Annual Concussion Symposium. A public forum on May 10, and presentations and discussions by leading concussion researchers on May 11 will highlight the consequences of concussions to the families involved. The forum, which is free and open to the public, features remarks by the family of Rowan Stringer and the father of former NHLer Paul Montador, both young athletes who lost their lives to the complications of concussions.


Four of Canada’s Most Decorated Female Athletes Donate Brains to Canadian Concussion Centre

http://www.uhn.ca/corporate/News/PressReleases/Pages/Four_Canada_most_decorated_female_athletes_donate_brains_to_Canadian_Concussion_Centre.aspx
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Fri May 18, 2018 7:20 am    Post subject: Kyle's Story: Reply with quote

Kyle's Story: Minnesota Family Raising Awareness about CTE | KSTP.com


http://kstp.com/news/kyles-story-minnesota-family-raising-awareness-about-cte/4886728/?cat=1

Kyle's Story: Minnesota Family Raising Awareness about CTE | KSTP.com
Kyle missed most of ninth grade because of recurring headaches. The pounding resumed even after what seemed to be minor collisions or hits to the head. A football to the head while playing catch at a Halloween party led to headaches for 14 months. All totaled, he'd suffered at least 10 severe concussions from grade school into high school, his mother said.

"I know when people look at it now they are like 'Geez, you didn't handle that very well,'" Beth said. "But at that point we hadn't heard of a concussion protocol."

In college, Kyle's pain, depression and anxiety had become overwhelming. In 2015, he committed suicide in his dorm room at the age of 20. In a suicide note, he wrote that the concussions "altered" his life.

"He told me on multiple occasions, 'Something is wrong with my brain – there is something wrong with it,''' Beth said.

KSTP's 'Fighting Back' Investigation

Out of their grief, his parents became determined to find the answers that had eluded their son for so long – all in the hope to raise awareness for other parents whose children have suffered similar head injuries.

Beth and her husband Mike sent their son's brain to a Veterans Administration hospital in Boston, Mass., where researchers are studying the long-term impact of concussions and hits to the head.

An examination of Kyle's brain tissue revealed he had the early stages of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE.

He is one of the youngest people in the country to be diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease.

Researchers at the lab have diagnosed the disease – after death – in former professional football and hockey players, and veterans who have suffered repeated head trauma.

CTE, researchers say, is linked to symptoms that include memory loss, confusion, erratic behavior and personality changes – including depression and suicidal thoughts.

5 EYEWITNESS NEWS was granted rare access to the lab earlier this year where Dr. Ann McKee, director of Boston University's CTE Center, explained how brain donations from families like the Raarups have expanded their research to include non-professional athletes.

"I can never wrap my head around these young people that have this disease," Dr. McKee said in interview.

Watch that investigative report by clicking the dropdown below. Read the full story, video included, here.

Family of Late Minnesota Hockey Star Waiting for Results from CTE Lab
Kyle's diagnosis had finally provided his parents with an explanation for his struggles.

"We were just relieved," his mother said. "If we had known about CTE, it would have changed how we approached multiple concussions."

Beth and Mike say that they do not want Kyle's injuries and death to frighten other families whose children are playing contact sports.

"Other kids on his team, they got hit in the head but they didn't have that prolonged problem with it," Beth said.

Instead, they said they hope their son's struggle increases awareness of the potential consequences of repetitive head trauma.

"People need to know about it so we can look at long-term effects," Beth said as she held back tears. "You don't ever want this."
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Sun May 20, 2018 8:10 am    Post subject: CTE in the Female Brain Seminar Reply with quote

CTE in the Female Brain Seminar

DESCRIPTION
CTE in the Female Brain:
Researching Answers for Women Athletes, Veterans and Brain Injury Survivors

DATE AND TIME
Wed, May 23, 2018
3:00 PM – 7:00 PM EDT


LOCATION
Mount Sinai Medical Center
1468 Madison Ave
Hatch Auditorium
New York, NY 10029

3:00 – 3:05 pm Welcome (Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD)
3:05 – 3:10 pm Introduction to Pink Concussions (Katherine Price Snedaker, LCSW)
3:10 – 3:25 pm Systematic Review of TBI in Women (Yelena Goldin, PhD)
3:25 – 3:55 pm The PINK Panel moderated by Katherine Snedaker
“Freya” – Domestic Violence Survivor
Samantha – Sports Concussion
Harmony Allen – Military Service Injury
Natalie – Sports Concussion
Kimberly Archie – Motor Vehicle Accident

3:55 – 4:10 pm Case study: Neuropathology of CTE in Female with Autism (Patrick Hof, MD)
4:10 – 4:25 pm Clinical & Pathological markers of the Late Effects of TBI (K. Dams-O’Connor, PhD)
4:25 – 4:50 pm Plenary Speaker: Trisha Meili (the “Central Park Jogger”)
4:50 – 5:00 pm Break
5:00 – 5:10 pm Screening for TBI in Domestic Violence Shelters (K. Monahan, DSW, LCSW, LMFT)
5:10 – 5:25 pm Neuroimaging & Molecular Biomarkers of Repetitive Head Trauma (D. Dickstein, PhD)
5:25 – 5:40 pm Clinical trials for post-TBI PTSD (Greg Elder, MD & G. Perez-Garcia, PhD)
5:40 – 6:00 pm Panel discussion and Q&A (Sam Gandy, MD, PhD & all speakers)
6:00 – 7:00 pm Wine and cheese reception for audience and speakers

Sponsored by the Brain Injury Research Center at Mount Sinai (BIRC-MS) & the Friedman Brain Institute #Diverse Brains Initiative
If you would like to support this event with a donation, http://giving.mountsinai.org/birc
For more information about PINK Concussions, see http://www.PINKconcussions.com

Event info:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cte-in-the-female-brain-tickets-45031391103
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 5:56 pm    Post subject: Hockey Players Are the Next Frontier in Head Trauma Research Reply with quote

Hockey Players Are the Next Frontier in Head Trauma Research

“We can stop dilly-dallying and arguing about, is this a disease or is this my imagination?” she says. “There’s been a lot of blatant denial or obfuscation of the work. But now I think we’re at a point where, look, there’s a problem. We all know that. We need to work on solutions. Maybe that’s diagnosis during life, in young players especially so they can stop playing. Or we could identify how common this is in the hockey or football population.

“And if we can see it early, we have a much better chance of treating it or stopping it altogether.”

And for that, they need more brains.

Hockey Players Are the Next Frontier in Head Trauma Research
https://www.si.com/nhl/2018/05/07/cte-nhl-hockey-head-trauma
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injury

Preliminary research using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging shows changes in the myelin content of white matter in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury. Myelin changes are apparent at the time of injury and 3 months afterward. For more details, see the article, "Prospective study of myelin water fraction changes after mild traumatic brain injury in collegiate contact sports, by Heather S. Spader, MD, and colleagues, published today in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

...When asked about the study, Dr. Spader replied, "We were surprised by the finding of increased myelin in the contact sports players compared with non-contact sports players at baseline and 3 months after injury. Using the mcDESPOT sequence, we can see that there is a remyelination process after an injury. The next question, however, is to determine if the increased myelin leads to the formation of a type of scar tissue that can cause disorganized signaling in the brain and which can eventually lead to an increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia.”

Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injury
Read more: https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-04-acute-chronic-myelin-mild-traumatic.html
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 6:01 pm    Post subject: “How you say things matter” Reply with quote

“How you say things matter”

Warmath said today’s student-athletes need to be told in plain language about the dangers of brain injury.

“How you say things matter,” she said. “If you soften something, it won’t be taken as seriously. If you want people to listen, you have to be willing to say what we know.”

Researchers are testing a new fact sheet and new education materials highlighting the negative consequences of failing to report a concussion, including “putting yourself at greater risk for dementia or other mental health problems later in life.”

Warmath said other messages being tested include: “If you choose not to report a concussion then you are potentially putting yourself at risk of death from a second concussion. You’re also potentially putting yourself at risk for not graduating or not getting the job you wanted or not being able to stay in a relationship.”

Wisconsin researcher: Sharpen warnings about brain injury
Read more: http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/wisconsin-researcher-sharpen-warnings-about-brain-injury/article_ea907059-050b-50f2-8961-1f1e1a01dc0f.html#pq=3Saxji
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Mon May 28, 2018 6:28 pm    Post subject: The lack of follow-up after a concussion is concerning Reply with quote

More than half of concussion patients seen at top-level trauma centers appear to fall off the radar shortly after diagnosis

Although millions of Americans suffer concussions each year, many aren't given information about traumatic brain injury or follow-up care, a new study finds.

"The lack of follow-up after a concussion is concerning because these patients can suffer adverse and debilitating effects for a very long time," said study lead author Seth Seabury.

"Even patients who reported experiencing significant post-concussive symptoms often failed to see a provider. This reflects a lack of awareness, among patients and providers, that their symptoms may be connected to their brain injury," Seabury added.

He’s director of a population health initiative at the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics.

The findings, published online May 25 in JAMA Network Open, are based on a sample of 831 patients who went to a top-level trauma center with a concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Of those, 47 percent said they were given educational materials about TBI when they were discharged. Forty-four percent said they saw a doctor or other health care professional in the three months after their injury.

Of 28 percent of patients whose CT scans showed they had a brain injury, about 40 percent did not see a health provider three months after discharge, the researchers reported.

In addition, about one-third of the patients had three or more moderate-to-severe concussion symptoms within three months, but only about half of those patients had a follow-up visit, the researchers found.

Although concussions are often labeled mild, that term can be misleading, the researchers pointed out. People can have significant symptoms after a concussion, including migraines, thinking issues, vision loss, memory loss, emotional distress or personality disorders.

Too many patients are being treated as if a concussion is a minor injury, study co-author Dr. Geoffrey Manley said in a journal news release.

"This is a public health crisis that is being overlooked. If physicians did not follow-up on patients in the emergency department with diabetes and heart disease, there would be accusations of malpractice," he said.

Manley is principal investigator of the ongoing Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury study, or TRACK-TBI.

An estimated 3.2 million to 5.3 million Americans live with long-term health effects from a traumatic brain injury, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Moreover, TBIs accounted for 2.8 million emergency department visits in the United States in 2013, and more than $76 billion in direct and indirect costs.

"Everyone who falls off their bike, slips off their skateboard or falls down the steps needs to be aware of the potential risks of concussion," Manley said.

Seabury concluded that "the study shows that we need to give patients and doctors the tools to better identify who should be going in for follow-up care.”

Little Follow-Up for Many Concussion Patients
Read more: https://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20180525/little-follow-up-for-many-concussion-patients#1
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2018 11:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

protecting children from risk

“The research is clear — when children participate in high-impact, high-contact sports, there is a 100 percent risk of exposure to brain damage and once you know the risk involved in something, what’s the first thing you do? You protect children from it.”

Children are Suffering Brain Injuries from Contact Sports—And Now Parents are Demanding Action
Read more: https://www.healthline.com/health-news/science-says-to-ban-youth-football#3
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 2:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Athletes’ head injuries can provoke surprisingly long-lasting harm

Elite athletes are some of the strongest people in the world. They train day after day to prepare for national and international competitions. Many hope to stand on the Olympic podium with a gold medal. For every athlete who succeeds, though, many others are derailed by injury. And not all of those injuries will be visible.

But elite athletes are not the only ones at risk. Nearly 1 in 5 U.S. adolescents, for instance, have sustained a concussion. This is a particularly nasty type of head injury. The statistic comes from a new survey reported September 26 in the journal JAMA. And more than 1 in every 20 teens, its data show, reported having been concussed two or more times.

Affected athletes may not be able to compete again for weeks, months — even years. Indeed, scientists and doctors had long thought that concussed people could safely return to regular activities once their symptoms went away. New data now dispute that.

Stopping concussions before they happen may be the only way to prevent long-term damage to the brain and how it works. That’s the conclusion of the researchers behind these studies. And although anyone can sustain a head injury, athletes in many sports face a special risk. Among those most likely to incur a concussion are those who play football and hockey. Those taking part in the winter Olympic sports of snowboarding, skiing and bobsled also are at risk.

Particularly disturbing, new research shows that even without a concussion, head injuries can lead to long-term damage. They may even lead to a brain disease known as CTE.


Athletes’ head injuries can provoke surprisingly long-lasting harm
Even as symptoms from concussion and other injuries fade, brain impairments may last years
Read more: https://www.sciencenewsforstudents.org/article/athletes-head-injuries-can-provoke-surprisingly-long-lasting-harm
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greybeard58



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PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonder why studies show many hockey players don't take concussions seriously?

When the National Hockey League announced in late 2011 that Hockey Hall of Famer Pat LaFontaine would star in a weekly documentary called Making of a Royal about his coaching of a Midget rep hockey team, the league promised an “unprecedented” series with behind-the-scenes footage.

The 24-part series about the Long Island, N.Y., Royals was shown on the NHL Network, NHL.com, and the NHL’s YouTube channel.

Episode nine covered the issue of brain injuries in hockey, a particularly noteworthy subject because LaFontaine’s 15-year NHL career ended due to post-concussion symptoms.

Six days before that five-minute Making of a Royal episode was posted on YouTube on Dec. 16, 2011, NHL vice-president of media relations Frank Brown ordered NHL video producer Ryan Bader to remove a section of LaFontaine’s comments about concussions.

“Once you get a concussion you are four to six times more likely to get another one – and it’s probably exponential from there,” LaFontaine said in a clip that was dropped from the show.

It wasn’t the only clip Brown asked to have removed.

“The closing quote from Pat LaFontaine about ‘A lot less mothers and fathers cringing, wondering when’s the next ambulance going out…’ MUST go,” Brown wrote in a Dec. 10, 2011, email to Bader.

Copies of Brown’s emails were included in a 256-page transcript of NHL public relations executive Gary Meagher’s Oct. 7, 2015, deposition in Toronto.

Meagher’s deposition was among more than 30 held in connection with the NHL concussion lawsuit, filed in a U.S. federal court in Minnesota in 2013.

Brown wasn’t deposed in connection with the NHL concussion lawsuit and Meagher said he didn’t know why his colleague demanded changes to the video.

“Why would Frank Brown from your communications group want that to be deleted from a video that was being produced by the NHL?” plaintiffs’ lawyer Mark Dearman asked.

“I don’t know the answer to that,” Meagher said.

Former NHLer Brendan Shanahan, then director of player safety for the league, also appeared in episode nine of Making of a Royal.
Brown also asked for an edit of Shanahan’s interview clips.

At one point, Shanahan said, “There’s a tremendous amount of peer pressure if you’ve got a banged up shoulder or a banged up knee, it’s sort of like, ‘Look, your ankle will heal over the summer, get through this, for us.’ But I think when there’s a head injury, the brotherhood wants to come together and protect the guy with that head injury.”

Brown ordered Bader to cut the rest of Shanahan’s quote where he said, “This might not end over the summer … it might affect him for the rest of his life … might end his career.”

Brown wrote, “THE FOLLOWING MUST BE DELETED” about another clip of the video that showed Shanahan on the ice in an NHL game “looking up/dazed.”

All professional sports leagues and companies, of course, are in the business of trying to shape a favourable opinion in the public eye. And yet with a high-profile concussion lawsuit being argued in a U.S. federal court, that is especially so for the NHL, whose executives paid close attention to the LaFontaine series to remove any commentary that might be considered negative or controversial.

“It’s our job as communications people to promote our league, to promote our game,” Meagher testified during his deposition in Toronto.
The depositions show that the league’s efforts to gauge and help shape public and media opinion about issues such as fighting, head hits and violence in hockey were ongoing long before the concussion lawsuit was filed.

NHL knocks out hard-hitting concussion comments
Read more: https://www.tsn.ca/nhl-knocks-out-hard-hitting-concussion-comments-1.1099155

Chris Nowiski: “Wonder why studies show many youth, high school and collegiate hockey players don't take concussions seriously? New evidence reveals NHL has been silencing legends like Pat LaFontaine and Brendan Shanahan, preventing concussion advice from reaching the public.”
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:20 pm    Post subject: What Happens To A Brain When It Gets Rattled Reply with quote

What Happens To A Brain When It Gets Rattled

But mostly I think about that pale pink organ, the consistency of soft tofu, enclosed in leathery tissue and bone and shiny helmet, slamming directly into the container of its safe keeping. And I wonder if it’s worth it.

What Happens To A Brain When It Gets Rattled
Read more: https://deadspin.com/what-happens-to-a-brain-when-it-gets-rattled-1820189649
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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Research uncovers new link between head trauma, CTE, and ALS

That’s good news for Maria Baier McCauley, whose husband Chris died of ALS in August.

McCauley played high-level hockey for more than a decade, first with the London Knights and the Western Mustangs, and later in professional leagues in Europe. He suffered five or six concussions along the way, so when he was diagnosed in 2015 with ALS, he wondered whether his repeated brain injuries played a role.

His widow says McCauley would be glad to know that advances are being made into the understanding of ALS and brain trauma.

“He would be excited to know that they are making links that that would bring them closer to a treatment, or to prevention,” Baier McCauley told CTV News.
She says the Western research “points to the considerable risk to concussions, especially in younger kids” – something she says her husband worried about.

“Young brains are vulnerable, and that was a big concern for Chris,” she said.
She added she hopes this research helps lend support to the warnings about head blows in hockey and prompts changes to the game.

Research uncovers new link between head trauma, CTE, and ALS
Read more: https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/research-uncovers-new-link-between-head-trauma-cte-and-als-1.3760399
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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:32 pm    Post subject: Concussion study may ‘change the game’ Reply with quote

Concussion study may ‘change the game’
Researchers have identified evidence of early chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology after head impact -- even in the absence of signs of concussion. Early indicators of CTE pathology not only persisted long after injury but also spread through the brain, providing the best evidence to date that head impact, not concussion, causes CTE.

The findings, published online in the journal Brain, help to explain why approximately 20 percent of athletes with CTE never suffered a diagnosed concussion. The findings were based on analysis of human brains from teenagers with recent head injury, animal experiments that recreate sports-related head impact and military-related blast exposure, and computational models of the skull and brain during these injuries.

"Even with a low magnitude impact, one that wouldn’t rip or tear brain tissue, shearing can disrupt small blood vessels, nerve fibers and chemical channels in the brain.”

CTE is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by abnormal accumulation of tau protein around small blood vessels in the brain. CTE causes brain cell death, cognitive deficits and dementia. CTE pathology has been observed in brains of teenagers and adults with exposure to repeated head injury. However, the mechanisms that cause CTE and their relationship to concussion, subconcussive injury and traumatic brain injuries (TBI) like CTE remain poorly understood.

“Concussion appears to be distinct from CTE,” said William Moss, LLNL physicist and co-author on the paper. “This could be game changing. It means that we may need more than a concussion protocol to protect athletes.”

CTE has been observed in the brains of teenagers and adults with exposure to repeated head injury, both concussive and subconcussive episodes. A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association by other co-authors of this paper found signs of the neurodegenerative disease in 99 percent of the brains donated by families of former NFL players, in 91 percent of college football players and 21 percent of high school players.

Moss and computational engineer Andy Anderson joined a team of more than 40 researchers led by Dr. Lee Goldstein, Boston University School of Medicine. The Livermore team used computational modeling to understand why both impact and blast triggered CTE but only impact resulted in concussion. This surprising result uncoupled concussion and CTE and suggested different mechanisms leading to each.

Surprising observation and a eureka moment
Researchers began by examining four postmortem brains from teenage athletes who had sustained head-impact injuries just prior to death and comparing these brains to age-matched control brains. Analysis showed a spectrum of post-traumatic pathology, including one case of early-stage CTE and two cases with abnormal accumulation of tau protein. Brains from the control group did not show these pathological changes.

Then they tested the effects of a blast versus impact in animal experiments designed to produce identical motions of the head. Both loading mechanisms showed strong causal evidence linking head acceleration to TBI and early CTE, but there was one striking difference: Impact caused concussion but blast didn’t. These observations suggested that concussion and CTE might be unrelated.

“That result was very surprising,” Anderson said. “So, Willy [Moss] and I turned to supercomputer simulations to take a closer look.”

Moss has spent nearly a decade simulating how blast and impact interact with the skull and brain. Before partnering with Goldstein, his research focused on helmet pads, comparing the effectiveness of combat and football pads in protecting the brain from the effects of impact.

While it was impossible for Goldstein to design an experiment that could explain the surprising observation, the Livermore computational simulations provided Moss and Anderson a glimpse into why impact caused concussion while blast didn’t.

“We first looked at pressure fields and didn’t see anything surprising going on,” Moss said. “Then we looked at shear stress and saw a clear difference. We suspected we were on to something important. When I shared the results with Lee, he had a eureka moment: ‘Willy, I think you may have uncovered the cause of concussion.’”

In a blast, the pressure wave flows fairly uniform around the head. In an impact, the pressure is loaded through a more focused point. Even with a low magnitude impact, one that wouldn’t rip or tear brain tissue, shearing can disrupt small blood vessels, nerve fibers and chemical channels in the brain.

“All this takes place in less than a millisecond,” Moss said. “The concussion occurs before there is any significant head motion.”

The simulations were completely consistent with the experimental data, and the result proved crucial for the research team, helping them conclude that the force-loading mechanism (impact versus blast) at the time of injury shapes the effect on the brain, and confirming that the mechanisms that cause concussion are distinct from those that lead to CTE.

These findings have direct relevance for athletes and military veterans. This study provides the best evidence to date that the neurodegenerative disease is triggered by repeated neurotrauma, not concussion.

“Our findings provide strong causal evidence linking head impact to TBI and early CTE, independent of concussion,” Goldstein said. “To prevent the disease, you have to prevent head impact – it’s hits to the head that cause CTE.”

"Even with a low magnitude impact, one that wouldn’t rip or tear brain tissue, shearing can disrupt small blood vessels, nerve fibers and chemical channels in the brain.”

Concussion study may ‘change the game’
Read more: https://www.llnl.gov/news/concussion-study-may-‘change-game’
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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 12:01 am    Post subject: Kyle's Story: Reply with quote

One of the youngest people in the country to be diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease

Kyle's Story: Minnesota Family Raising Awareness about CTE | KSTP.com

Kyle missed most of ninth grade because of recurring headaches. The pounding resumed even after what seemed to be minor collisions or hits to the head. A football to the head while playing catch at a Halloween party led to headaches for 14 months. All totaled, he'd suffered at least 10 severe concussions from grade school into high school, his mother said.

"I know when people look at it now they are like 'Geez, you didn't handle that very well,'" Beth said. "But at that point we hadn't heard of a concussion protocol."

In college, Kyle's pain, depression and anxiety had become overwhelming. In 2015, he committed suicide in his dorm room at the age of 20. In a suicide note, he wrote that the concussions "altered" his life.

"He told me on multiple occasions, 'Something is wrong with my brain – there is something wrong with it,''' Beth said.

Out of their grief, his parents became determined to find the answers that had eluded their son for so long – all in the hope to raise awareness for other parents whose children have suffered similar head injuries.

Beth and her husband Mike sent their son's brain to a Veterans Administration hospital in Boston, Mass., where researchers are studying the long-term impact of concussions and hits to the head.

An examination of Kyle's brain tissue revealed he had the early stages of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, or CTE.

He is one of the youngest people in the country to be diagnosed with the degenerative brain disease.

Researchers at the lab have diagnosed the disease – after death – in former professional football and hockey players, and veterans who have suffered repeated head trauma.

CTE, researchers say, is linked to symptoms that include memory loss, confusion, erratic behavior and personality changes – including depression and suicidal thoughts.

5 EYEWITNESS NEWS was granted rare access to the lab earlier this year where Dr. Ann McKee, director of Boston University's CTE Center, explained how brain donations from families like the Raarups have expanded their research to include non-professional athletes.

"I can never wrap my head around these young people that have this disease," Dr. McKee said in interview.

Kyle's diagnosis had finally provided his parents with an explanation for his struggles.

"We were just relieved," his mother said. "If we had known about CTE, it would have changed how we approached multiple concussions."

Beth and Mike say that they do not want Kyle's injuries and death to frighten other families whose children are playing contact sports.

"Other kids on his team, they got hit in the head but they didn't have that prolonged problem with it," Beth said.

Instead, they said they hope their son's struggle increases awareness of the potential consequences of repetitive head trauma.

"People need to know about it so we can look at long-term effects," Beth said as she held back tears. "You don't ever want this.”

Kyle's Story: Minnesota Family Raising Awareness about CTE | KSTP.com
Watch the video: http://kstp.com/news/kyles-story-minnesota-family-raising-awareness-about-cte/4886728/
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greybeard58



Joined: 22 Aug 2004
Posts: 1736

PostPosted: Sun Jun 17, 2018 12:02 am    Post subject: Kyle Raarup played hockey in Minnesota Reply with quote

Kyle Raarup played hockey in Minnesota

Kyle Raarup
September 24, 1995 - November 12, 2015

Kyle loved all sports, all his life. He played as much and as many sports as he possibly could, with football and hockey being his favorites. He was a fiercely competitive and driven athlete. He was naturally gifted with speed, agility, and great eye-hand coordination. He was a running back for football, offensive player in hockey, and could play any position he was put in for baseball. Kyle loved it all and loved the friendships that playing sports offered him.

As it is with any dedicated athlete, Kyle was hit many times with only minor injuries. Concussions, in our mind, happened when you got knocked out from a hit, or got your "bell rung". As the injuries continued and we became more informed about concussions we realized that Kyle had suffered many minor concussions from about 4th grade on. It wasn't until Kyle was in 8th grade and experienced a check from behind into the boards in hockey when he started having lasting symptoms that we could not control. He waited the recommended two weeks before playing again, only to be hit from behind again when he returned to play. This time he had such severe headaches and other symptoms that he was unable to return to sports or school. Each bump to his head after that caused increasingly severe symptoms for an extended amount of time.

Over the years of seeing innumerable doctors and other medical professionals, Kyle was diagnosed with post concussive syndrome. While it was nice to have a name for what he was going through, Kyle wanted something that would help his symptoms. This seemed to be an elusive goal. He was a trooper and tried every therapy, testing, medication, vitamin, whatever we could find to try to alleviate the pain and memory/thinking difficulties he was experiencing. None worked well, which was a source of great frustration to Kyle. He wanted his brain to go back to normal.

Kyle was able to attend college where he flourished with the assistance of the student services program that allowed him accommodations for his anxiety and inability to handle a lot of sensory input during testing. Kyle loved college and the friends he made there. He was outgoing, cheerful, energetic, and fun to be around. His continued struggles with his anxiety/depression, memory problems and a new stomach ailment overwhelmed him and he took his life on 11/12/15. His brain was donated to the Boston University CTE study in order to find out the answer to his nagging question "what's wrong with my brain and why can't it be fixed?"

In December 2016, we found out that Kyle was diagnosed with Stage I CTE along with some brain abnormalities (micro hemorrhages and hippocampus damage) that helped his family get some answers to that nagging question of "what was going on in his brain?" His suicide and the Boston University brain study has helped raise awareness in our community of the lasting impact that concussions can have on the life of a young adult. The loss of a child, brother and friend to many has hit us all hard and will be something that we struggle with for a long time. We are grateful to the Concussion Legacy Foundation for their research and to finally give us some answers, and for their efforts to continue to find answers for future athletes. Kyle would be proud to be a part of this important research and the continued efforts made to understand the devastating affects concussions have on young lives.

We miss him every day, but are proud of who Kyle was and how he has helped us and others understand mental illness and concussions.

By Kayla, Tyler, Mike and Beth Raarup
Read more: https://concussionfoundation.org/story/kyle-raarup
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