Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

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Odds of a season happening

Yes 100%
27
40%
50-50
26
39%
probably not
12
18%
no way
2
3%
 
Total votes: 67

HockeyFan1969
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:03 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by HockeyFan1969 » Tue May 12, 2020 2:23 pm

Jeffy95 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:00 pm
blueblood wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 5:00 pm
Raising taxes to fund high school sports when our communities and local businesses are experiencing shutdowns with 20+% unemployment is likely not realistic.
I think it all depends on the community, of course. And that’s the beauty of a referendum, the property owners decide. You’re talking about a pretty small amount per household, again, based on the community of course. You could even exempt businesses. Anyone who lost their job in MN should be getting equal or more of their pay through unemployment. I think it’s a viable solution. We have to fund High School sports and Activities. That isn’t really a choice in my mind.
I think it would be highly unlikely any community would pass such a referendum much less be able to get a ballot in place to take a vote. Not something that happens quickly under the best of circumstances. The other thing to keep in mind is that unemployment payments in Minnesotan can't exceed $740/week. Even with the CARES Act add-on of $600/week you are talking a weekly max of $1,340 or $69,680 annualized (state max is 26 weeks and there is a formula that is less than 100% income) IIRC. So only people earning less than $70K would essentially be near whole or more. That leaves a lot of folks out in the cold, although I would concede that the jobs most heavily impacted by furlough/layoff/firings fall in the lower range on income. Also, a lot of senior citizens are watching their retirement money carefully and I wouldn't expect a lot of support at a hypothetical ballot box even if a referendum could be put to a vote. No, I think the players families are going to be left to shoulder the load if there is a season. I still optimistic that they will find some way to play hockey this year. Not as optimistic about fall sports.

nu2hockey
Posts: 635
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2013 8:19 pm

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by nu2hockey » Tue May 12, 2020 4:42 pm

HockeyFan1969 wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 2:23 pm
Jeffy95 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:00 pm
blueblood wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 5:00 pm
Raising taxes to fund high school sports when our communities and local businesses are experiencing shutdowns with 20+% unemployment is likely not realistic.
I think it all depends on the community, of course. And that’s the beauty of a referendum, the property owners decide. You’re talking about a pretty small amount per household, again, based on the community of course. You could even exempt businesses. Anyone who lost their job in MN should be getting equal or more of their pay through unemployment. I think it’s a viable solution. We have to fund High School sports and Activities. That isn’t really a choice in my mind.
I think it would be highly unlikely any community would pass such a referendum much less be able to get a ballot in place to take a vote. Not something that happens quickly under the best of circumstances. The other thing to keep in mind is that unemployment payments in Minnesotan can't exceed $740/week. Even with the CARES Act add-on of $600/week you are talking a weekly max of $1,340 or $69,680 annualized (state max is 26 weeks and there is a formula that is less than 100% income) IIRC. So only people earning less than $70K would essentially be near whole or more. That leaves a lot of folks out in the cold, although I would concede that the jobs most heavily impacted by furlough/layoff/firings fall in the lower range on income. Also, a lot of senior citizens are watching their retirement money carefully and I wouldn't expect a lot of support at a hypothetical ballot box even if a referendum could be put to a vote. No, I think the players families are going to be left to shoulder the load if there is a season. I still optimistic that they will find some way to play hockey this year. Not as optimistic about fall sports.

Good points, one thing....i believe your interpretation of mn unemployment pay is inaccurate...the highest payment allowed is 66.7% of $740/wk ($493.58)....the wording is a little strange on the state's site.....before taxes....then the federal $600 will be an automatic but separate payment...

goldy313
Posts: 3507
Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2002 11:56 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Tue May 12, 2020 4:46 pm

Byron, MN has a $50 million school budget referendum on the ballot today with a huge part of it being for new athletic facilities. Byron passes referendums at a very high rate, however since setting a date for the referendum the COVID-19 virus hit and Mayo furloughed or cut hours for about 40% of its employees.

It will be interesting to see how this turns out.

Also of note, today the Cal State University system cancelled on campus learning through the fall semester. The school system includes three Mountain West Conference members.

update....the Byron referendum failed by a 2:1 margin

CB00
Posts: 380
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by CB00 » Wed May 13, 2020 8:06 pm

nu2hockey wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 4:42 pm
HockeyFan1969 wrote:
Tue May 12, 2020 2:23 pm
Jeffy95 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:00 pm


I think it all depends on the community, of course. And that’s the beauty of a referendum, the property owners decide. You’re talking about a pretty small amount per household, again, based on the community of course. You could even exempt businesses. Anyone who lost their job in MN should be getting equal or more of their pay through unemployment. I think it’s a viable solution. We have to fund High School sports and Activities. That isn’t really a choice in my mind.
I think it would be highly unlikely any community would pass such a referendum much less be able to get a ballot in place to take a vote. Not something that happens quickly under the best of circumstances. The other thing to keep in mind is that unemployment payments in Minnesotan can't exceed $740/week. Even with the CARES Act add-on of $600/week you are talking a weekly max of $1,340 or $69,680 annualized (state max is 26 weeks and there is a formula that is less than 100% income) IIRC. So only people earning less than $70K would essentially be near whole or more. That leaves a lot of folks out in the cold, although I would concede that the jobs most heavily impacted by furlough/layoff/firings fall in the lower range on income. Also, a lot of senior citizens are watching their retirement money carefully and I wouldn't expect a lot of support at a hypothetical ballot box even if a referendum could be put to a vote. No, I think the players families are going to be left to shoulder the load if there is a season. I still optimistic that they will find some way to play hockey this year. Not as optimistic about fall sports.

Good points, one thing....i believe your interpretation of mn unemployment pay is inaccurate...the highest payment allowed is 66.7% of $740/wk ($493.58)....the wording is a little strange on the state's site.....before taxes....then the federal $600 will be an automatic but separate payment...
No the state max is $740 plus $600 from Feds. Not 66.7 of $740. I’ve been furloughed from work for 6 weeks and my payment is the max $740 plus $600

Wise Old Man
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2019 8:11 pm

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Wise Old Man » Fri May 15, 2020 10:13 pm

Spoke with a Northern Minnesota assistant principle today that I have a good relationship with and this person indicated that, at the moment, it doesn't look good for fall sports. When I asked about winter sports, this person wasn't much more confident. The reality is -- and my assistant principle friend agreed -- unless we can get a legitimate theraputic on the market by September or October that can 99.9999% guarantee someone who gets infected won't end up in ICU or on a vent, the likelihood of high school sports being played is probably on the low side for the coming school year.

ThatMNHockeyGuy62
Posts: 426
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by ThatMNHockeyGuy62 » Sat May 16, 2020 10:39 am

Wise Old Man wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 10:13 pm
Spoke with a Northern Minnesota assistant principle today that I have a good relationship with and this person indicated that, at the moment, it doesn't look good for fall sports. When I asked about winter sports, this person wasn't much more confident. The reality is -- and my assistant principle friend agreed -- unless we can get a legitimate theraputic on the market by September or October that can 99.9999% guarantee someone who gets infected won't end up in ICU or on a vent, the likelihood of high school sports being played is probably on the low side for the coming school year.
Honest question not meant to spark debate (since we’ve seen how well that works on this board). Does the 99.9999% need to be for teens or for the population in general? Additionally, I’m not sure what the rate of ICU admission is for Flu or other infectious diseases that are endemic in our society, but I would imagine it would basically have roughly match those rates, right?

Bigcat99
Posts: 326
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 1:26 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Bigcat99 » Sat May 16, 2020 12:32 pm

Jeffy95 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 3:37 pm
jg2112 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 12:48 pm
Stang5280 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 12:03 pm

So would you say that the loss of football could cause a domino effect on other sports for the upcoming season? It’s hard to envision a school committing resources to non-revenue spring sports in that event. There may be some exceptions, like East or Rapids where hockey is a big revenue sport, but overall that paints a bleak picture for 2020-21 high school activities.
My opinion - much more of the cost of participation will fall on individual athletes and their families. Sports that cost $200-$300 could now cost $800-$1000 to cover costs. That would lead to a decrease in athletic participation in many sports. I think football and hockey are sports that could be particularly hard hit in such a financial scenario.
They could always raise funds through a property tax referendum also. You would have to think a simple majority of the voters could get behind temporarily funding High School sports and activities.
There isn't any way in hell that the majority of property owners around ISD 318 would go for any additional taxes to fund kids playing sports right now. ALL property taxes -Municipal, school district, & county have been going up like crazy in recent years - seemingly in an effort to try to keep pace with growth like a metro area. To get the referendum passed last year to build 2 new elementary schools (2nd attempt), the board had to get the special election in early enough in the spring before the snowbirds came back from TX,FL, AZ, etc... and that barely passed - when nothing else was being voted on, ie. extremely low voter participation.
It is what it is!

Wise Old Man
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2019 8:11 pm

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Wise Old Man » Sat May 16, 2020 1:47 pm

ThatMNHockeyGuy62 wrote:
Sat May 16, 2020 10:39 am
Wise Old Man wrote:
Fri May 15, 2020 10:13 pm
Spoke with a Northern Minnesota assistant principle today that I have a good relationship with and this person indicated that, at the moment, it doesn't look good for fall sports. When I asked about winter sports, this person wasn't much more confident. The reality is -- and my assistant principle friend agreed -- unless we can get a legitimate theraputic on the market by September or October that can 99.9999% guarantee someone who gets infected won't end up in ICU or on a vent, the likelihood of high school sports being played is probably on the low side for the coming school year.
Honest question not meant to spark debate (since we’ve seen how well that works on this board). Does the 99.9999% need to be for teens or for the population in general? Additionally, I’m not sure what the rate of ICU admission is for Flu or other infectious diseases that are endemic in our society, but I would imagine it would basically have roughly match those rates, right?

He stated that the primary concern with allowing sports or other extra-curricular activities to continue is more about kids being potential asymptomatic vectors of the virus -- bringing it home to family, especially grandparents or others with underlying health issues -- versus the kids getting significantly ill themselves. That, and the recent development of the "Kowasakis syndrome-like" conditions that have become evident in kids from literally infants to 20 yr olds. Granted, that issue to this point is pretty limited in terms of percentage of likely kids infected actually contracting it. Still, it's a way the virus is now affecting kids which only adds another concern that needs to be considered.

Personally, I think we need to keep in mind that, other than the 18 yr old seniors, by law these are obviously children we are talking about. So, unlike say major college football or basketball where there's obviously the money and staffing to do significant week to week testing with an incorporated quarantine program for those testing positive, at the high school level, I highly doubt there's a single school district in our state that could even begin to think about doing that for even a single sport, let alone the other sports or activities they sponsor. Because, as we're all aware, there's no way any administration will allow just a single sport/activity to go on without all of them being able to. And, considering this is the high school level we're talking about, that's as it should be in my opinion since their number one responsibility is class room education.

More importantly, if you try to play sports, what happens when a player on a team does test positive? According to the CDC and Minnesota Health Department guidelines, if we're doing contact tracing the proper way, if any player were to test positive then not only do they need to quarantine for 14 days but, so does every other person with recent direct contact with that infected player. That would literally mean every player on the JV and Varsity, as well as all coaches and any team managers. That could even be true if a parent, grandparent, or other person a player was in direct contact with tests positive. Obviously, if an entire team is quarantined for two weeks, that's going to play havoc with not only their schedule but that of their future opponents. In fact, if after a player from a team tests positive and they just played a game within the previous few days or a week, then the players from that team who actually played against the infected player will be asked to quarantined for 14 days as well.

The point is, for good or for bad (in my opinion, far more bad than good), school/governmental administrators have become extremely sensitive to any potential legal issues. Thus, if a risk -- especially a well proven health risk like this where simply not playing completely removes all liability for them -- has an obvious way to 100% remove that risk, they're going to take that path. On a related note, at the moment the governor's emergency powers have mandated that all sports facilities are closed. Now, that may change come June 1st. However, it's my understanding that the mayor in any community has the authority to strengthen any statewide measures. Meaning, if a given community has a significant outbreak, then it's very possible that they could close their community's rink(s). Meaning, that community's school(s) wouldn't be able to practice or play. And, if a team can't practice, another but different argument regarding player safety could be made.

The reality is that this specific type of health issue creates such unique challenges to continuing extra-curricular activities that it's just far easier to shut them down completely until we have a truly effective mass produced therapeutic or vaccine. Recently, both USA Hockey and Hockey Canada released their initial return to play comments and neither governing body even touches on the topic of possibly playing games. Instead, they both talk about limited on-ice, individual skills drills where coaches can minimize risk of spread. In fact, in USA Hockey's statement (which was a joint directive with the U.S. Figure Skating Association and the U.S. Rinks Association) the Disclaimer at the end, seems pretty clear that the USA Hockey insurance will not cover any Covid related litigation. If I'm reading that accurately -- this is a good time for Elliott to way in :wink: -- I highly doubt many youth associations will be able to find affordable supplemental insurance to cover those possibilities. And, Hockey Canada's Director actually goes out of his way to state that the decision to return to play will be based completely on their governmental health directives, and not any pressure of "we have to get back on the ice" from players, coaches, administrators, or parents.

In the end, we're all hopeful we don't lose any more sports' seasons -- Legion baseball is already canceled for the season and, where I'm at, summer baseball for Gopher State and Little League is on hold until at least July 1st as the City owns all the fields and they have closed them until then to any organized activities which is extremely disappointing to my 13 yr old. And, If we were to lose the entire hockey season, it would obviously have a significantly detrimental effect on both overall player development at every level, not to mention the effect on our higher-end high school juniors and seniors as it relates to potential post-high school playing opportunities. The worst-case scenario for high school hockey being, if the MSHSL doesn't play but, somehow USA Hockey allows the various Junior Hockey and AAA teams to play, we will have a flight of top-end talent from our state unlike anything previous. In fact, if the majority of high-end underclassmen leave as well, the possibility those players could stay with their AAA or Junior teams the following season could cause an overall drop in talent that would take a few years to overcome. Let's just hope that science can develop that therapeutic in time as I highly doubt a vaccine will be available in significant numbers prior to next spring. Be smart and stay safe everyone.

goldy313
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Sat May 16, 2020 10:31 pm

Football remains the most popular high school sport in the country but it’s numbers have declined 6 years in a row. Football is probably the sport most in jeopardy going forward and football has already been dealing with health concerns. My hunch is even if football is played in Minnesota the numbers and amount of teams will have a notable decline. Maybe not varsity teams but the trend of less under varsity teams will see an acceleration. I also think there will be schools with no football, I hope the state lets schools make this determination on their own based on their own situation. I highly doubt any school administration or the state wants the kids distance learning into November.

I have heard other states proposing delaying the start of high school football a month or more, that really isn’t feasible in Minnesota as safety becomes a concern due to cold weather injuries. Hockey has great beneficial gift of time. November is still 6 months away. If football/fall sports are delayed I think winter sports get delayed as well to allow fall sports athletes to at least mostly finish their season.

Lastly, to run sports you need officials.....luckily hockey officials tend to be on the younger side as compared to most sports. Add to that, as everyone knows the spring sports season was canceled. What most do not know is we officials pay the MSHSL to register, spring sports officials were not refunded their fees. Don’t think every fall sports official isn’t taking notice of this. The MSHSL went to a third party for administration of the officials and that has been a soup sandwich. There may be a lack of officials this fall, again, hockey is lucky time is on their side.

Wise Old Man
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Wise Old Man » Sun May 17, 2020 2:25 am

goldy313 wrote:
Sat May 16, 2020 10:31 pm
Football remains the most popular high school sport in the country but it’s numbers have declined 6 years in a row. Football is probably the sport most in jeopardy going forward and football has already been dealing with health concerns. My hunch is even if football is played in Minnesota the numbers and amount of teams will have a notable decline. Maybe not varsity teams but the trend of less under varsity teams will see an acceleration. I also think there will be schools with no football, I hope the state lets schools make this determination on their own based on their own situation. I highly doubt any school administration or the state wants the kids distance learning into November.

I have heard other states proposing delaying the start of high school football a month or more, that really isn’t feasible in Minnesota as safety becomes a concern due to cold weather injuries. Hockey has great beneficial gift of time. November is still 6 months away. If football/fall sports are delayed I think winter sports get delayed as well to allow fall sports athletes to at least mostly finish their season.

Lastly, to run sports you need officials.....luckily hockey officials tend to be on the younger side as compared to most sports. Add to that, as everyone knows the spring sports season was canceled. What most do not know is we officials pay the MSHSL to register, spring sports officials were not refunded their fees. Don’t think every fall sports official isn’t taking notice of this. The MSHSL went to a third party for administration of the officials and that has been a soup sandwich. There may be a lack of officials this fall, again, hockey is lucky time is on their side.
Goldy, good observation regarding football's challenges. The assistant principal I spoke with stated that schools would certainly prefer to avoid distance learning if at all possible. Still, he said avoiding that possibility is still very much up in the air at this point. Also, in regard to your point about letting individual schools make the decision on extra-curricular activities, I just don't see that happening. Schedules are set a couple years in advance and if a number of schools were to choose not to play, it would make scheduling a nightmare, no matter the sport. As for the average age of hockey officials; I'm not sure which games you've been watching but, the average age statewide is around 45. In our area, there are at least 6 or 7 over 50, and one over 65. :P

goldy313
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Wed May 20, 2020 10:03 pm

Iowa starts High School baseball on June 1st, games on June 15. Walz schedule has gyms opening up late summer, that looks bad for fall sports.

FWIW there are officiating web sites trying to figure out what sports will look like going forward, early direction seems to advocate the use of masks and gloves..... you can’t blow a whistle with a mask on for example. How do you wear a mouth guard under a mask? Lots of issues will need to be worked through.

Eastgreaser
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Eastgreaser » Wed May 20, 2020 11:11 pm

You are on drugs if you think 1 penny of any tax increase will go to fund any raise in cost of highschool sports...even in the most die hard sports communities with storied programs. That isn’t an option

ThatMNHockeyGuy62
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by ThatMNHockeyGuy62 » Thu May 21, 2020 10:43 am

I’ve got a crazy idea that many may scoff at, but for hockey at least, can’t they just require kids to wear the plastic bubbles on their helmets? Won’t be perfect, as they have holes on the bottom, but essentially so do the nurse face shields.

Obviously not a 100% solution for everything, but seems like a simple enough one that could actually prevent a lot of spread.

jg2112
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by jg2112 » Thu May 21, 2020 10:53 am

ThatMNHockeyGuy62 wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 10:43 am
I’ve got a crazy idea that many may scoff at, but for hockey at least, can’t they just require kids to wear the plastic bubbles on their helmets? Won’t be perfect, as they have holes on the bottom, but essentially so do the nurse face shields.

Obviously not a 100% solution for everything, but seems like a simple enough one that could actually prevent a lot of spread.
It'd probably be a similar cost, and much more effective, to purchase one of those Abbott machines and test every player when he/she enters the rink.

That might sound like an exorbitant purchase by a school district, but, it can be used by fall / winter / spring sports and would be the single quickest way to identify an infection and isolate the player / players from spreading the virus.

jg2112
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by jg2112 » Thu May 21, 2020 12:05 pm

The news coming out from several universities (Notre Dame, etc.) is they are planning to start fall semester early, skip fall break, and end the semester by November to avoid what they perceive to be the next wave of COVID-19.

Let's just say that if that's what everyone is expecting, and if there's no vaccine and no ability to test and trace positive cases, I think the chances of a winter hockey season are trending downward.

ThatMNHockeyGuy62
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by ThatMNHockeyGuy62 » Thu May 21, 2020 6:37 pm

Your idea of testing everybody on the way in is certainly more effective, but I would argue on the cost comparison. Plus, if the bubble masks were required that cost would almost certainly be passed on to individual players and their family, much like a stick or most other other required equipment (yes I know some schools provide gloves, breezed covers, etc..). The new mask would be but a very small dent in each hockey family’s yearly budget.

As for your second post about colleges plans, I think you’re right on the perception of where things are headed. But those decision makers are basing that off of predictions only, as nobody really knows what’s going to happen by then. I think a better place to look in the near term would be the European schools that have reopened in mass and to see what happens there. Data so far shows transmission among kids is extremely limited to nonexistent. Will that hold as schools reopen? Scientists appear to disagree, so we will have to see.

goldy313
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Thu May 21, 2020 9:28 pm

ESPN had an article today about college football and that each Governor and local governments will have a lot to say about what happens. All the states in the SEC have opened up to a large degree, same with the Big 12. The ACC is largely open but Boston College will be a trouble spot. The Big Ten is a mess, Michigan, Illinois, New Jersey, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Maryland are all likely shut down to groups until July at the very least. The PAC 10 is in worse shape with only 3 schools looking like they may even open in the fall.

Even within conferences it is very likely Iowa and Nebraska would allow crowds, very doubtful Michigan, Minnesota, or New Jersey would allow crowds.

It will all play out for an interesting summer.

Wise Old Man
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Wise Old Man » Fri May 22, 2020 2:45 am

ThatMNHockeyGuy62 wrote:
Thu May 21, 2020 10:43 am
I’ve got a crazy idea that many may scoff at, but for hockey at least, can’t they just require kids to wear the plastic bubbles on their helmets? Won’t be perfect, as they have holes on the bottom, but essentially so do the nurse face shields.

Obviously not a 100% solution for everything, but seems like a simple enough one that could actually prevent a lot of spread.
This actually has some merit. Would be a minor adjustment for the players that aren't used to wearing a bubble but, I have to believe it woould definitely reduce distribution of infectious droplets at least some. As for the whole quick-test idea; first, I have no idea how much those test kits cost but I'm sure they're not cheap. I assume well beyond the budgets of most individual high schools. You'd also have to have someone trained to run it properly -- possibly adding more cost. And currently, that test is only about 80% accurate so, I'd be surprised to see any school administrator willing to take that much of a chance on a possible false-negative.

Next, if an asymptomatic player can expel 1000 droplets that might hang in the air for up to 8 minutes by just talking in a louder voice, how many droplets does an infected 17 yr old expel when he/she is breathing as heavily as possible at the end of a 45 second shift? And yes, I realize that at ice level there's a fair amount of moving air due to the movement of the players up and down the ice. Still, between the 10 total skaters and 3 officials that are constantly and quickly moving back and forth around the entire ice surface, I have to assume that would produce prodigious amounts of droplets around much of the ice surface, at various moments throughout a single period.

Another issue in regards to the officials; all three of them but, especially the linesman, are often positioned directly in front of a players bench where the amount of in-air droplets is probably at it's greatest concentration of anywhere else on the rink for the longest time. As Goldy stated earlier, it's difficult to officiate with a surgical or N-95 mask on. Nor does any of that account for all of the face-to-face trash talking/accidental spitting that goes on after many of the stoppages. :roll: What about players battling in front of the net or in the corners during play? Another excellent opportunity for transmission. And most, if not all of these are challenges for B-Ball, football, soccer, Lacrosse, and volleyball as well. Again, I truly hope I'm wrong but, there are so many potential obstacles to overcome that I see playing sports -- especially team sports -- but also, band, or choir, or robotics very difficult to pull off without that therapeutic or, better yet, a vaccine.

elliott70
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Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by elliott70 » Fri May 22, 2020 8:53 am

Minnesota Hockey Return To The Game Guidelines (draft as of 5/22/2020)

Minnesota Hockey Return To The Game Guidelines
As we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic while returning players to the ice, Minnesota Hockey will continue to provide updates to our associations and members. These considerations focus on several phases of returning our members to the rinks throughout the state of Minnesota. Each association should have its own plan in place for returning to the rink. Local rinks and associations need to follow the guidelines set forth by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH) and its Guidance for Social Distancing, as well as local government officials in determining when, and how, it is appropriate to return to the rinks, including requirements or guidelines for physical distancing, size of gatherings or number of people permitted in a facility, or wearing masks, etc. The information in this document is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The knowledge and circumstances around COVID-19 are changing constantly and, as such, Minnesota Hockey makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of this information.
As you plan for a return to the ice, below are some ideas to consider to assist with developing a return to hockey programming in context of COVID-19. Please know these are not requirements, but are recommendations and ideas to consider when evaluating your programming. As conditions and requirements may vary throughout the state, our best advice is to follow state and local government guidelines and recommendations from the CDC. Until COVID-19 is either eradicated, a vaccine is developed, or a cure is found, there is no way of completely eliminating the risk of infection.
We are thankful to all of those essential workers and first responders who are guiding us and keeping us safe and healthy during this pandemic. Remember that we can contribute to helping eliminate COVID-19 by doing these four things:
1. Physical Distance
2. Wash Hands and Practice Safe Hygiene Habits
3. Clean Surfaces & Equipment between uses
4. Staying Home When Sick Or Experiencing Any Symptoms
Minnesota Hockey will aim to open programming in phases, which are subject to change at all times. They are also subject to restrictions placed by state or local governments.
*It should be noted that Minnesota Hockey will not sanction on-ice activities prior to restrictions being lifted by the state government.
**It should also be noted that on-ice activities involving players aged 6 or younger or “Learn to Play” skaters are not recommended in Phase 1
***The Dates listed next to each phase are not meant to indicate that the transition to that phase will happen on that date. However, Minnesota Hockey will be providing updated guidelines prior to that date if the transition can be made to enter the next phase. Those guidelines will be subject to regulations imposed by the state government, as well as recommendations from the MDH and CDC.





Phase 1 – Practices, Clinics, Tryouts Only
Phase 1 is intended to launch on June 1, or when guidance is provided by the State on when ice arenas have the ability to open. The date is subject to change at all times.
*Learn to Play programs and those activities involving players age 6 and Under are not recommended in Phase 1
Arriving at the Rink
1. Players or coaches with any risk factors or illnesses should not participate in any on-ice activity. Any players, coaches or spectators exhibiting symptoms or signs of an illness should not be in the facility at any point.
2. Participants should utilize the Minnesota Symptom Screener Guide prior to any on-ice activity. These screens should be monitored by each association.
3. All participants must be USA Hockey registered for the 2020-21 season to participate in any Minnesota Hockey sanctioned on-ice activity.
4. Families should provide coach/team manager with accurate contact information in the event of emergency while the player is at the arena. This information MUST be accurate and the responsible party MUST be able to reach the designated person if the need arises.
5. Players should arrive to the rink no more than 15 minutes before the start of the on-ice activities. Anyone arriving earlier than 15 minutes before their start time should wait outside of the facility and be socially distanced from others.
6. If there is an activity at the rink before the teams scheduled start, the incoming teams should wait until all players from the prior event have vacated the building. There should not be interaction between the two groups.
7. Players aged 11 and older should be dropped off at the rink, and picked up afterward. Their parents/guardians should not be in the arena. Players aged 10 and under are allowed one parent/guardian in the rink to help with any equipment needs. Those parents/guardians may also be at the rink, socially distanced from others, to provide assistance to the player if needed throughout practice time. Masks are advised and may be required by the facility for parents/guardians.
8. Whenever possible, players should use the restroom at home prior to leaving for the rink in an effort to limit bathroom use at the facility.
9. Players should arrive to the arena fully dressed with the exception of skates (coming in to the arena with skate guards on is ideal) and helmets. Exceptions may be made for goalies, who may need to put on additional equipment at the rink.
10. Players should be bringing their own rehydration liquids to the rink in clearly marked or labeled containers with the player’s identity. The container should be re-sealable. Players should NOT plan on refilling their containers at the rink.
11. Prior to the first on-ice session, coaches and/or association leaders should host an e-Meeting to explain procedures to parents, and to answer any questions.
12. Coaches should be as prepared as possible to ensure complete utilization of the allowed ice time. This also helps ensure that players are not distracted and know that they need to be on time and ready to go, not engaged in other areas of the building.
13. Each association and team should have an emergency plan for any positive outbreak within the team, association or community
14. Each association and team should have an alert plan to association members and anyone else who may have been exposed following any positive outbreak within team, association or community.
15. Associations should work with rink partners, and be aware that some communities may not open rinks despite the Stay at Home order being lifted.
16. Associations should be sharing their plan with all members participating in their on-ice events.
17. Dryland activities inside the arena are not advised during Phase 1.
18. Safesport policies will continue to be in effect in all phases. There should always be a minimum of two adults at every on-ice event, and there should be no unsupervised one-on-one interaction between a player and a coach.
Phase 1 On-Ice Activities for Practices, Clinics and Tryouts:
1. Within the program, create consistent pods of the same staff, volunteers and participants with a maximum number of 10 people in each pod. Ice rinks will be allowed to have two (2) pods of 10 people or less at a time with no mixing between the groups.
2. Players need to maintain as much separation as possible. Whenever possible, coaches should be promoting social distancing on the ice, while recognizing that there may be times of close contact by players.
3. Avoid using player benches.
4. Coaches should be keeping players active and engaged at all times. Players should never leave the ice during a practice unless absolutely necessary.
5. The number of coaches on the ice should be kept to a minimum, and it should be noted that each coach will count toward the number of people allowed on the ice as stipulated by the Department of Health.
6. Extra “helpers” or players who are not full-time members of the team should not be on the ice.
7. Drills should be age appropriate (station-based) and non-contact in Phase 1.
8. Coaches should avoid talking face-to-face with players, as well as avoid contact with players whenever possible. Physical contact may be necessary when assisting a young player or a player with a disability (helping up or adjusting equipment), but whenever possible, coaches should provide assistance without physical contact, or ask the player’s parent/guardian to assist.
9. Prior to the completion of the ice time, players should be excused from the rink one by one and through different exit points of the rink. Do not ask players to participate in picking up pucks or other equipment from the ice.
After on ice activities are completed:
1. No on or off ice interaction (socializing, team meetings, dryland activities) should occur following the conclusion of practice. Players should remove skates and helmets and leave the premises within 15 minutes of the end of practice.
2. Parents/Guardians must be made aware of time when the players will be done. The parents or person assigned to pick up players at the arena must be punctual. Players should not have to wait for a ride.
3. Players should vacate the arena immediately to allow for the next user group to enter.
4. Coaches or other responsible adults should remain until all players are safe and removed from the premises.
5. While at home, players should clean and disinfect gear after each use.
Phase 2 – Games and Scrimmages
An announcement on the implementation of Phase 2 is intended to be made by August 1, but is subject to guidance provided by the State. The date of announcement is subject to change at all times.
Please note that many aspects of Phase 1 should also be practiced during Phase 2
*Learn to Play Programs and 6 & Under programs should start on-ice activities at this time, provided there are no severe setbacks during Phase 1
1. At the scorer’s/announcer’s box, best practice would be that one assigned adult will be responsible for clock and scorebook with nobody else allowed in the area.
2. Whenever possible, resurfacing of the ice sheet should only take place before or after a game. During breaks in action, players should remain on the bench.
3. There should be no more than two coaches allowed in the bench area during games. Coaches on benches should be wearing masks.
4. During a stoppage of play caused by a save, the goalie should drop the puck on the ice for the official to retrieve.
5. There should be no pregame or postgame handshakes. Teams should honor each other after the game with a stick salute.
6. A two official system shall be used for games at all levels
Phase 3
An announcement on the implementation of Phase 3 (regular season hockey) is intended to be made by September 1, but is subject to guidance provided by the State. This date of announcement is subject to change at all times.

goldy313
Posts: 3507
Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2002 11:56 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Fri May 22, 2020 1:03 pm

yet I can not go a gym :roll:

Wise Old Man
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2019 8:11 pm

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by Wise Old Man » Fri May 22, 2020 1:52 pm

elliott70 wrote:
Fri May 22, 2020 8:53 am
Minnesota Hockey Return To The Game Guidelines (draft as of 5/22/2020)

Minnesota Hockey Return To The Game Guidelines
As we navigate through the COVID-19 pandemic while returning players to the ice, Minnesota Hockey will continue to provide updates to our associations and members. These considerations focus on several phases of returning our members to the rinks throughout the state of Minnesota. Each association should have its own plan in place for returning to the rink. Local rinks and associations need to follow the guidelines set forth by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Minnesota Department of Health’s (MDH) and its Guidance for Social Distancing, as well as local government officials in determining when, and how, it is appropriate to return to the rinks, including requirements or guidelines for physical distancing, size of gatherings or number of people permitted in a facility, or wearing masks, etc. The information in this document is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. The knowledge and circumstances around COVID-19 are changing constantly and, as such, Minnesota Hockey makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of this information.
As you plan for a return to the ice, below are some ideas to consider to assist with developing a return to hockey programming in context of COVID-19. Please know these are not requirements, but are recommendations and ideas to consider when evaluating your programming. As conditions and requirements may vary throughout the state, our best advice is to follow state and local government guidelines and recommendations from the CDC. Until COVID-19 is either eradicated, a vaccine is developed, or a cure is found, there is no way of completely eliminating the risk of infection.
We are thankful to all of those essential workers and first responders who are guiding us and keeping us safe and healthy during this pandemic. Remember that we can contribute to helping eliminate COVID-19 by doing these four things:
1. Physical Distance
2. Wash Hands and Practice Safe Hygiene Habits
3. Clean Surfaces & Equipment between uses
4. Staying Home When Sick Or Experiencing Any Symptoms
Minnesota Hockey will aim to open programming in phases, which are subject to change at all times. They are also subject to restrictions placed by state or local governments.
*It should be noted that Minnesota Hockey will not sanction on-ice activities prior to restrictions being lifted by the state government.
**It should also be noted that on-ice activities involving players aged 6 or younger or “Learn to Play” skaters are not recommended in Phase 1
***The Dates listed next to each phase are not meant to indicate that the transition to that phase will happen on that date. However, Minnesota Hockey will be providing updated guidelines prior to that date if the transition can be made to enter the next phase. Those guidelines will be subject to regulations imposed by the state government, as well as recommendations from the MDH and CDC.





Phase 1 – Practices, Clinics, Tryouts Only
Phase 1 is intended to launch on June 1, or when guidance is provided by the State on when ice arenas have the ability to open. The date is subject to change at all times.
*Learn to Play programs and those activities involving players age 6 and Under are not recommended in Phase 1
Arriving at the Rink
1. Players or coaches with any risk factors or illnesses should not participate in any on-ice activity. Any players, coaches or spectators exhibiting symptoms or signs of an illness should not be in the facility at any point.
2. Participants should utilize the Minnesota Symptom Screener Guide prior to any on-ice activity. These screens should be monitored by each association.
3. All participants must be USA Hockey registered for the 2020-21 season to participate in any Minnesota Hockey sanctioned on-ice activity.
4. Families should provide coach/team manager with accurate contact information in the event of emergency while the player is at the arena. This information MUST be accurate and the responsible party MUST be able to reach the designated person if the need arises.
5. Players should arrive to the rink no more than 15 minutes before the start of the on-ice activities. Anyone arriving earlier than 15 minutes before their start time should wait outside of the facility and be socially distanced from others.
6. If there is an activity at the rink before the teams scheduled start, the incoming teams should wait until all players from the prior event have vacated the building. There should not be interaction between the two groups.
7. Players aged 11 and older should be dropped off at the rink, and picked up afterward. Their parents/guardians should not be in the arena. Players aged 10 and under are allowed one parent/guardian in the rink to help with any equipment needs. Those parents/guardians may also be at the rink, socially distanced from others, to provide assistance to the player if needed throughout practice time. Masks are advised and may be required by the facility for parents/guardians.
8. Whenever possible, players should use the restroom at home prior to leaving for the rink in an effort to limit bathroom use at the facility.
9. Players should arrive to the arena fully dressed with the exception of skates (coming in to the arena with skate guards on is ideal) and helmets. Exceptions may be made for goalies, who may need to put on additional equipment at the rink.
10. Players should be bringing their own rehydration liquids to the rink in clearly marked or labeled containers with the player’s identity. The container should be re-sealable. Players should NOT plan on refilling their containers at the rink.
11. Prior to the first on-ice session, coaches and/or association leaders should host an e-Meeting to explain procedures to parents, and to answer any questions.
12. Coaches should be as prepared as possible to ensure complete utilization of the allowed ice time. This also helps ensure that players are not distracted and know that they need to be on time and ready to go, not engaged in other areas of the building.
13. Each association and team should have an emergency plan for any positive outbreak within the team, association or community
14. Each association and team should have an alert plan to association members and anyone else who may have been exposed following any positive outbreak within team, association or community.
15. Associations should work with rink partners, and be aware that some communities may not open rinks despite the Stay at Home order being lifted.
16. Associations should be sharing their plan with all members participating in their on-ice events.
17. Dryland activities inside the arena are not advised during Phase 1.
18. Safesport policies will continue to be in effect in all phases. There should always be a minimum of two adults at every on-ice event, and there should be no unsupervised one-on-one interaction between a player and a coach.
Phase 1 On-Ice Activities for Practices, Clinics and Tryouts:
1. Within the program, create consistent pods of the same staff, volunteers and participants with a maximum number of 10 people in each pod. Ice rinks will be allowed to have two (2) pods of 10 people or less at a time with no mixing between the groups.
2. Players need to maintain as much separation as possible. Whenever possible, coaches should be promoting social distancing on the ice, while recognizing that there may be times of close contact by players.
3. Avoid using player benches.
4. Coaches should be keeping players active and engaged at all times. Players should never leave the ice during a practice unless absolutely necessary.
5. The number of coaches on the ice should be kept to a minimum, and it should be noted that each coach will count toward the number of people allowed on the ice as stipulated by the Department of Health.
6. Extra “helpers” or players who are not full-time members of the team should not be on the ice.
7. Drills should be age appropriate (station-based) and non-contact in Phase 1.
8. Coaches should avoid talking face-to-face with players, as well as avoid contact with players whenever possible. Physical contact may be necessary when assisting a young player or a player with a disability (helping up or adjusting equipment), but whenever possible, coaches should provide assistance without physical contact, or ask the player’s parent/guardian to assist.
9. Prior to the completion of the ice time, players should be excused from the rink one by one and through different exit points of the rink. Do not ask players to participate in picking up pucks or other equipment from the ice.
After on ice activities are completed:
1. No on or off ice interaction (socializing, team meetings, dryland activities) should occur following the conclusion of practice. Players should remove skates and helmets and leave the premises within 15 minutes of the end of practice.
2. Parents/Guardians must be made aware of time when the players will be done. The parents or person assigned to pick up players at the arena must be punctual. Players should not have to wait for a ride.
3. Players should vacate the arena immediately to allow for the next user group to enter.
4. Coaches or other responsible adults should remain until all players are safe and removed from the premises.
5. While at home, players should clean and disinfect gear after each use.
Phase 2 – Games and Scrimmages
An announcement on the implementation of Phase 2 is intended to be made by August 1, but is subject to guidance provided by the State. The date of announcement is subject to change at all times.
Please note that many aspects of Phase 1 should also be practiced during Phase 2
*Learn to Play Programs and 6 & Under programs should start on-ice activities at this time, provided there are no severe setbacks during Phase 1
1. At the scorer’s/announcer’s box, best practice would be that one assigned adult will be responsible for clock and scorebook with nobody else allowed in the area.
2. Whenever possible, resurfacing of the ice sheet should only take place before or after a game. During breaks in action, players should remain on the bench.
3. There should be no more than two coaches allowed in the bench area during games. Coaches on benches should be wearing masks.
4. During a stoppage of play caused by a save, the goalie should drop the puck on the ice for the official to retrieve.
5. There should be no pregame or postgame handshakes. Teams should honor each other after the game with a stick salute.
6. A two official system shall be used for games at all levels
Phase 3
An announcement on the implementation of Phase 3 (regular season hockey) is intended to be made by September 1, but is subject to guidance provided by the State. This date of announcement is subject to change at all times.
Elliott, thanks for sharing this. Looks pretty good.

elliott70
Posts: 13615
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2004 3:47 pm
Location: Bemidji

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by elliott70 » Fri May 22, 2020 2:51 pm

President Oleheiser put a committee together a week ago and they have this. For us to at least plan.
Last edited by elliott70 on Sat May 23, 2020 6:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

jg2112
Posts: 584
Joined: Fri Mar 29, 2013 8:36 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by jg2112 » Fri May 22, 2020 4:13 pm

I'm sorry. These rules are well-thought out and obviously everybody is working in the best interests of youth hockey. But I can't read these and think anything other than this is all a big mistake.

Anything in phase 1 can be done at home, on rollerblades or feet, without potentially spreading the virus as an asymptomatic carrier.

When sports open up in June, I fear what we're going to see in July/August due to asymptomatic spread. I'm not just talking hockey. I am talking basketball, volleyball, football, cross country, baseball, every sport doing summer training.

These guidelines would be perfect to apply if we had collectively done the job to stop the virus. We have not - we're only down 28% from our peak. We have 1.15 million active cases in the country and the priority is to interact more?

I feel like we're all speeding towards a cliff for...what reason? Summer hockey? The rules are wise, the reason we're seeing them? Less so.

east hockey
Site Admin
Posts: 6962
Joined: Tue Dec 10, 2002 8:33 pm
Location: Proctor, MN
Contact:

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by east hockey » Sat May 23, 2020 6:38 am

Posts which get political will be deleted.

Lee
Message Board arsonist since 2005
Egomaniac since 2006

goldy313
Posts: 3507
Joined: Tue Mar 05, 2002 11:56 am

Re: Will there be high school hockey for 2020-2021?

Post by goldy313 » Sat May 23, 2020 11:31 pm

No offense, this entire thing is political. The Vikings will return to their facility, so will the Gophers. For cripes sakes St Paul is in the running for having the NHL return here in a pod....you pay income taxes in the state in which the income was made, meaning Minnesota stands to take in millions. The general public will not have access to fitness centers, even those recovering from injury. We can’t allow kids in school but sports are Ok. That is a very sad statement on priorities. If Minnesota Hockey had any morals they would acknowledge that if kids can’t be in school they shouldn’t be at hockey practice. All of us know the hockey rink is among the most unsanitary places there is. You can, actually, smell the bacteria growing on the equipment. To blow a whistle is to spit in the air.

I am scheduled to officiate 7 on 7 football camps in June, blowing a whistle is putting saliva in the air.....an aerosol. This is nuts, the whole thing. No rhyme or reason in the decision making. My city closed the swimming pools but will open the hockey rinks.....one generates money one loses money.....it is not easy to figure out which is which. Hockey parents have money and political pull, the parents of the kids in the Boy’s and Girl’s Club (who use the public pools) don’t.

Everything is political. Get over it. I have no answers, but the inconsistency is maddening.

It is going to get far more political as time goes on. Roseau is not Roseville. Caledonia is not Champlain Park. It will get ugly come August.
Last edited by goldy313 on Sun May 24, 2020 12:15 am, edited 1 time in total.

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